the-drawing-center:

This summer, The Drawing Center is opening the Scriptorium, an intimate space for the public to peruse our out-of-print publications.

Conceived of by our Bookstore Manager, Genevieve Wollenbecker, the genesis for the Scriptorium project was the regular requests she received from visitors to view out-of-print books. For example, 3 x Abstraction is one of the most regularly requested publications from visitors. However, it is not only out-of-print, but also only one copy is included in The Drawing Center’s archival collection. Given both its popularity and rarity, it is only available for thousands of dollars on sites like eBay. In an effort to make this beautiful and interesting text accessible—and due in part to Genevieve’s personal interest in note-taking and how people utilize books—she has created a Scriptorium, a sacred space for people to review our collection of books.

The term scriptorium is closely associated with medieval history, though contrary to popular belief, scriptoria were extremely rare. Theoretically, they were rooms within monasteries where scholarly monks would transcribe texts, such as the Bible. The intent was to create a place of learning and to pass down knowledge. They are commonly considered to be niche-like spaces, providing a small and intimate environment.

On select weekends (July 11 – August 24), visitors can come to The Drawing Center’s Scriptorium to look through works in our collection. Given the smallness of the space (our bookstore closet is being converted for this purpose), only one person will be allowed in at a time. We will not be accepting reservations, so the Scriptorium will operate on a first-come, first-serve basis. Simply stop by the front desk upon entry to gain access. If there is a wait for the room, we may limit visits to 10 minutes. We will have supplies (paper and pencils) available, though we encourage guests to bring their own materials to transcribe, draw, note-take, etc.

As a way to preserve the impact of the Scriptorium after it closes, we will ask to scan any notes or drawings visitors make. Some images may be displayed online or in our space as a way to archive the experience. Special thanks to Genevieve for her hard work on this project and throughout her time at The Drawing Center. We wish her all the best in her new role as a high school English teacher in her home state of Hawai’i, which starts this fall.

the-drawing-center:

The Drawing Center’s 2014-2015 exhibition schedule

Upcoming exhibitions include The Intuitionists, our final Selections show, inspired by Colson Whitehead’s novel of the same name; Small., small-scale works by a group of international contemporary artists; and Thread Lines, which frames drawing as an open-ended act in which lines can be woven, stitched, knit—even embodied. In addition, we will highlight first generation Bauhaus artist Xanti Schawinsky’s work from the 1940s and present artist Sari Dienes’s first museum show, devoted to her drawings from the 1950s. In early 2015, celebrated children’s author and illustrator Tomi Ungerer will have his first, major career retrospective in the United States. Also next spring, The Drawing Center will launch its stairwell project with a commission by contemporary artist Abdelkader Benchamma. In April 2015, we explore four hundred years of portrait drawings from live models with Portraits from the École des Beaux-Arts Paris. At the same time, in Natalie Frank: The Brothers Grimm, Frank applies her visual and psychological acumen to Grimm’s fairytales. Finally, in May 2015, we will present a selection of videos by the Turkish artist İnci Eviner, whose work forges a relationship between new-media techniques and traditional Turkish art practices.

At The Drawing Center
The Intuitionists, July 11–August 24, 2014
Small., July 11–August 24, 2014
Thead Lines, September 19–December 14, 2014
Xanti Schawinsky: Head Drawings and Faces of War, September 19–December 14, 2014
Sari Dienes, October 8–November 16, 2014
Open Sessions #3, November 21–December 14, 2014
Tomi Ungerer: All in One, January 9–March 22, 2015
Abdelkader Benchamma: Representation of Dark Matter, March 2015–2016
Portraits from the École des Beaux-Arts Paris, April 10–June 28, 2015
Natalie Frank: The Brothers Grimm, April 10–June 28, 2015
Open Sessions #4, April 10–May 15, 2015
İnci Eviner, May 29–June 28, 2015


Image captions: from The Intuitionists - Nyeema Morgan, Like It Is: Prelude, 2014. Variable. Courtesy of the artist.; from Small. - Paul Chiappe, Untitled 48, 2010. Pencil on paper5 5/16 x 6 7/64 inches. Collection Lea Weingarten.; from Thread Lines - Sheila Hicks, Punched Notations, 2012. Paper and synthetic yarn, 9 1/2 x 7 1/2 inches. Andrea and José Olympio Pereira Collection; from Xanti Schawinsky, L’Agressore (Faces of War), signed on front lower right corner: “Xanti 1942”, 1942. Mixed media, watercolor and pen, 73.7 x 54.2 cm (29” x 21 3/8”). Unique, Courtesy of The Estate of Xanti Schawinsky.; from Sari Dienes, Woodblock VI (Artists’ proof Yaddo), 1953. Ink on rice paper, 19 x 18 inches. Courtesy Sari Dienes Foundation, Pomona, NY.; from Tomi Ungerer, Final art for The Three Robbers, page 5, 1961, Collage of cut paper, gouache, and marker on paper. 11.75 x 9.25 inches. Courtesy of Children’s Literature Collection, Free Library of Philadelphia.; from Abdelkader Benchamma, Hole and Landscape, 2013, Ink and pen on paper, 21.65 x 17.72 inches; from Portraits from the École des Beaux-Arts Paris - Jacob Ferdinand Voet, Portrait de femme vue de face, 1639-1700, Colored pencil on blue paper. 22.5 X 16 cm; from Natalie Frank, Cinderella  II, 2011-4, Gouache and chalk pastel on paper. 22 x 30 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Rhona Hoffman Gallery (Chicago); ACME (Los Angeles).; from İnci Eviner. Parliament, 2010, 1080p25 HD video data with stereo, 3 min. Copyright İnci Eviner 2010. Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Nev, Istanbul.

the-drawing-center:

"With straightforward intentions and a clear premise, Len Lye created work far ahead of its time and deserving of ours now." -Paige K. Bradley for ArtforumLen Lye: Motion Sketch is on view through June 8.
Artforum full-text:
A well-established figure in the history of experimental cinema, Len Lye’s stature in art history, especially as a crucial link between the early avant-garde of animation and mid-century modernism, has not been properly championed in the United States. This new exhibition makes significant strides towards rectifying that, as well as introducing a body of drawings, paintings, and memorably mysterious photograms never before exhibited, along with documentation of his kinetic sculptures. The foundation of Lye’s practice, which began in the 1920s and continued all the way until his death in 1980, was to visually convey the feeling of motion, primarily constructed with lines, as in his series of eleven small pencil drawings, “Sketch for Motion Composition,” 1938. Bold, unfussy marks congregate and crosshatch, elongating into dervish-like forms with each successive drawing, in tune with his fantastical sketches for monumental sculptures nearby encased that had to wait for technology to catch up to their ingenuity.A looping selection of the artist’s short films takes over the downstairs gallery. Anticipating Stan Brakhage by decades, films such as A Colour Box, 1935, and Trade Tattoo, 1937, pioneered direct filmmaking with their complex printing, color grading, and direct-drawing techniques. In the latter, utilizing black-and-white outtakes from the British General Post Office’s Film Unit’s documentaries, Lye transforms through sprightly editing, racing patterns, and a Cuban orchestra score in what was once excess footage of labor into a superb modernist work. The film is an exuberant declaration of the accumulative beauty and civic virtue of industry circulating across land and sea, flashing such declarations as “The rhythm of trade is maintained by the mails” before cutting to a train speeding by in the night, abstract shapes bopping and dashing across the composition, and colors exploding like fireworks. With straightforward intentions and a clear premise, Len Lye created work far ahead of its time and deserving of ours now.

the-drawing-center:

"With straightforward intentions and a clear premise, Len Lye created work far ahead of its time and deserving of ours now."
-Paige K. Bradley for Artforum

Len Lye: Motion Sketch is on view through June 8.

Artforum full-text:

A well-established figure in the history of experimental cinema, Len Lye’s stature in art history, especially as a crucial link between the early avant-garde of animation and mid-century modernism, has not been properly championed in the United States. This new exhibition makes significant strides towards rectifying that, as well as introducing a body of drawings, paintings, and memorably mysterious photograms never before exhibited, along with documentation of his kinetic sculptures. The foundation of Lye’s practice, which began in the 1920s and continued all the way until his death in 1980, was to visually convey the feeling of motion, primarily constructed with lines, as in his series of eleven small pencil drawings, “Sketch for Motion Composition,” 1938. Bold, unfussy marks congregate and crosshatch, elongating into dervish-like forms with each successive drawing, in tune with his fantastical sketches for monumental sculptures nearby encased that had to wait for technology to catch up to their ingenuity.

A looping selection of the artist’s short films takes over the downstairs gallery. Anticipating Stan Brakhage by decades, films such as A Colour Box, 1935, and Trade Tattoo, 1937, pioneered direct filmmaking with their complex printing, color grading, and direct-drawing techniques. In the latter, utilizing black-and-white outtakes from the British General Post Office’s Film Unit’s documentaries, Lye transforms through sprightly editing, racing patterns, and a Cuban orchestra score in what was once excess footage of labor into a superb modernist work. The film is an exuberant declaration of the accumulative beauty and civic virtue of industry circulating across land and sea, flashing such declarations as “The rhythm of trade is maintained by the mails” before cutting to a train speeding by in the night, abstract shapes bopping and dashing across the composition, and colors exploding like fireworks. With straightforward intentions and a clear premise, Len Lye created work far ahead of its time and deserving of ours now.

See Drawing in NYC!

the-drawing-center:

Check out these drawing exhibitions now on view in New York City!

1. Sigmar Polke: Early Woks on Paper at Michael Werner Gallery

on view through June 7, 2014

image

Image: “Untitled”, ca. 1967-1968, Gouache on envelope, 9 x 6 1/4 inches

Michael Werner Gallery, New York, presents an…

 Our new Len Lye: Motion Sketch catalog now available on issuu.com

http://issuu.com/drawingcenter/docs/drawingpapers115_lye

the-drawing-center:

The New York Times highlights SoHo art spaces today.
Read about what is happening in our neighbors’ spaces here. Highlights include the Swiss Institute, Artists Space, and apexart.
The Drawing Center is installing two new shows and reopens on Wed, April 17 with Lebbeus Woods and Len Lye.
Image: Heidi Bucher’s “Herrenzimmer,” at the Swiss Institute, on Wooster Street in SoHo.  Credit Byron Smith for The New York Times.

the-drawing-center:

The New York Times highlights SoHo art spaces today.

Read about what is happening in our neighbors’ spaces here. Highlights include the Swiss Institute, Artists Space, and apexart.

The Drawing Center is installing two new shows and reopens on Wed, April 17 with Lebbeus Woods and Len Lye.

Image: Heidi Bucher’s “Herrenzimmer,” at the Swiss Institute, on Wooster Street in SoHo. Credit Byron Smith for The New York Times.

the-drawing-center:

This week we will feature the commissioned film, 1846, that is included in the exhibition, Ferran Adrià: Notes on Creativity.  Produced by The Drawing Center, elBullirestaurant, and the graphic design firm Mogollon, the film presents every dish that Adrià served at elBulli from 1987 to 2011. 

the-drawing-center:

This week we will feature the commissioned film, 1846, that is included in the exhibition, Ferran Adrià: Notes on Creativity.  Produced by The Drawing Center, elBullirestaurant, and the graphic design firm Mogollon, the film presents every dish that Adrià served at elBulli from 1987 to 2011. 

clarew:

Oli getting inspired. (at The Drawing Center)

Love that kids get Ferran’s show!

clarew:

Oli getting inspired. (at The Drawing Center)

Love that kids get Ferran’s show!

the-drawing-center:


The Drawing Center and Artspace Celebrate Food and Art in a New Series of Print Portfolios by Ferran Adrià, Master Chef of elBulliThe Drawing Center, Artspace, and Ferran Adrià are proud to announce the launch of two new special limited edition print portfolios to coincide with the opening of Ferran Adrià: Notes on Creativity. Adrià has been recognized as one of the most important chefs in the world and over his 20 year career at elBulli in Spain he has single handedly changed the way we think about gastronomy and dining. A relentless innovator, Adria has used drawing and visualization as methods of communication and as foundational tools for creativity.  The two print portfolios, Theory of Culinary Evolution (15 prints) and Pictograms (15 prints), illustrate Adria’s approach to gastronomy and relate to both his highly efficient and analytic approach to food as well as his more playful and humorous side. SPECIAL OFFER: For a limited time only, patrons of The Drawing Center can receive 10% off Ferran Adria’s “Pictogram Series” and “Theory of Culinary Evolution” portfolios. Visit Artspace and enter FERRAN10 at checkout through January 24 to receive this exclusive offer. Individual prints are also available for $150 (unframed), but not at a discounted price. Ferran Adria: Notes on Creativity opens at The Drawing Center on Saturday, January 25 and will be on view until February 28, 2014. For more information about the exhibition visit drawingcenter.org here. 
Image: On left - Ferran Adrià, Theory of Culinary Evolution, 2013, Crayon, paint stick, and colored pencil on paper, one of sixty individual drawings, each: 11 11/16 x 8 1/4 inches. On right - Marta Mendez, Pictograms, 2001/2013, Archival pigment print on Hannemuhle paper. Fifteen prints, each: 12 x 12 inches. Both are courtesy of elBullifoundation.FERRAN10 is valid on Artspace.com through 1/24/2014 11:59pm EST and will take 10% off orders of the following portfolios of the works “Pictogram Series” and “Theory of Culinary Evolution” by Ferran Adria through 1/24/2014 11:59pm EST. The 10% discount is applied by using code FERRAN10 at checkout. This offer does not include orders of individual prints by the same name, nor can it be redeemed for cash, used on past purchases, or applied to gift cards. Limit of one use per customer. It cannot be combined with any other promotional codes, sitewide sales events, or used through the Inspace Trade program. Return requests must be made in accordance with our return policy. This offer is non-transferrable. Terms of offer are subject to change at any time.

the-drawing-center:

The Drawing Center and Artspace Celebrate Food and Art in a New Series of Print Portfolios by Ferran Adrià, Master Chef of elBulli

The Drawing Center, Artspace, and Ferran Adrià are proud to announce the launch of two new special limited edition print portfolios to coincide with the opening of Ferran Adrià: Notes on Creativity. Adrià has been recognized as one of the most important chefs in the world and over his 20 year career at elBulli in Spain he has single handedly changed the way we think about gastronomy and dining. A relentless innovator, Adria has used drawing and visualization as methods of communication and as foundational tools for creativity.  The two print portfolios, Theory of Culinary Evolution (15 prints) and Pictograms (15 prints), illustrate Adria’s approach to gastronomy and relate to both his highly efficient and analytic approach to food as well as his more playful and humorous side. 

SPECIAL OFFER:
For a limited time only, patrons of The Drawing Center can receive 10% off Ferran Adria’s “Pictogram Series” and “Theory of Culinary Evolution” portfolios. Visit Artspace and enter FERRAN10 at checkout through January 24 to receive this exclusive offer. Individual prints are also available for $150 (unframed), but not at a discounted price.

Ferran Adria: Notes on Creativity opens at The Drawing Center on Saturday, January 25 and will be on view until February 28, 2014. For more information about the exhibition visit drawingcenter.org here.


Image: On left - Ferran Adrià, Theory of Culinary Evolution, 2013, Crayon, paint stick, and colored pencil on paper, one of sixty individual drawings, each: 11 11/16 x 8 1/4 inches. On right - Marta Mendez, Pictograms, 2001/2013, Archival pigment print on Hannemuhle paper. Fifteen prints, each: 12 x 12 inches. Both are courtesy of elBullifoundation.

FERRAN10 is valid on Artspace.com through 1/24/2014 11:59pm EST and will take 10% off orders of the following portfolios of the works “Pictogram Series” and “Theory of Culinary Evolution” by Ferran Adria through 1/24/2014 11:59pm EST. The 10% discount is applied by using code FERRAN10 at checkout. This offer does not include orders of individual prints by the same name, nor can it be redeemed for cash, used on past purchases, or applied to gift cards. Limit of one use per customer. It cannot be combined with any other promotional codes, sitewide sales events, or used through the Inspace Trade program. Return requests must be made in accordance with our return policy. This offer is non-transferrable. Terms of offer are subject to change at any time.

hyperallergic:

The Handwriting on the Wall: Authors’ Notes as Art

Microscripts by Robert Walser at the Drawing Center (all photos by the author for Hyperallergic…

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hyperallergic:

The Handwriting on the Wall: Authors’ Notes as Art

Microscripts by Robert Walser at the Drawing Center (all photos by the author for Hyperallergic…

View Post